Plot From The Plain: Unobstructed

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Luke 6:37-42

While in seminary I was selected as a candidate for a special scholarship for one year of my studies that covered my full tuition AND gave me a stipend.

For books.

And when you’re in my vocation – you have great love for ANYONE who gives you money to purchase books or gifts you books.

Books books books – big love.

Books books books – also a big weight when it’s moving season (over 30 BOXES of books!) – but that’s not the point here.

I love when I turn to my bookshelf for a sermon resource and I can remember how it was gifted to me – much like when I come across most of the things in my house and I remember who gave them to Andrew and me as wedding presents.  The text I sought today came from my seminary book stipend – CS Lewis’ bestseller Mere Christianity.

In the text he offers this thought in his chapter on forgiveness:

For a long time I used to think this is a silly, straw-splitting distinction: how could you hate what a man did and not hate the man? But years later it occurred to me that there was one man to whom I had been doing this all my life – namely myself.*

Is it true that we can love the sinner and hate the sin?

We are a people – we are individuals – constantly in conflict.  The Apostle Paul describes it this way, “I do not understand my own actions.  For I do not what I want, but I do the very thing I hate…For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do” (Rom 7:15,19).

What causes us to do what we hate?  The sin that occupies our human condition. Sin breeds only brokenness and suffering.  The grace of God seeks to heal and make us whole.  I believe God’s grace manifests within our hearts as self-worth – that which enables us to love ourselves because God first loved us.  That self-worth, which is rooted in God’s love, alerts us to the problem of sin and sets us on the path of the redeemed.

Lewis continues:

However much I might dislike my own cowardice or conceit or greed, I went on loving myself.  There had never been the slightest difficulty about it.  In fact, the very reason why I hated the things was that I loved the man.  Just because I loved myself, I was sorry to find that I was the sort of man who did those things.  

Consequently, Christianity does not want us to reduce by one atom the hatred we feel for cruelty and treachery.  We ought to hate them.  Not one word of what we have said about them needs to be unsaid.  But [Christianity] does want us to hate them in the same way in which we hate things in ourselves: being sorry that the man should have done such things, and hoping, if it is anyway possible, that somehow, sometime, somewhere he can be cured and made human again.**

He can – she can – we can be cured and made human again.

I am convinced that this cure we seek comes through a life of faith.  It begins with the grace of God that we receive before we are even aware of it.  It continues as we actively receive and are claimed by God’s forgiveness in the moment of our conversion and redemption.  And it continues throughout our lives as God’s grace makes us more holy, as we grow in Christian maturity, as we are perfected in the faith.  The cure is realized as we are beautifully restored to the image in which we were made – the creation that God called very good.

I believe when we “love the sinner and hate the sin” we claim the hope of this cure – this ultimate redemption and restoration.  This doesn’t mean we fail to hold our neighbors accountable – or be held accountable ourselves.  We can hold one another accountable without casting judgment and in doing so we become companions for one another as God sanctifies.

I claim this hope for my family, my friends, my neighbors.  I know – I feel – their claim of this hope for me.

I will love the sinner and hate the sin.  Because you and me – we are equal and walking together.

Prayer: “Where shall my wondering soul begin? How shall I all to heaven aspire? A slave redeemed from death and sin, a brand plucked from eternal fire, how shall I equal triumphs raise, or sing my great Deliverer’s praise?

O how shall I the goodness tell, Father, which Thou to me hast showed? That I, a child of wrath and hell, I should be called a child of God, should know, should feel my sins forgiven, blessed with this antepast of Heaven!

And shall I slight my Father’s love? Or basely fear His gifts to own? Unmindful of His favors prove? Shall I, the hallowed cross to shun, refuse His righteousness to impart, by hiding it within my heart?

Outcasts of men, to you I call, harlots, and publicans, and thieves! He spreads His arms to embrace you all; sinners alone His grace receives; no need of Him the righteous have; He came the lost to seek and save.

Come, O my guilty brethren, come, groaning beneath your load of sin, His bleeding heart shall make you room, His open side shall take you in; He calls you now, invites you home; come, O my guilty brethren, come!

For you the purple current flowed in pardons from His wounded side, languished for you the eternal God, for you the Prince of glory died. Believe, and all your sin’s forgiven; only believe, and yours is Heaven!”***

Amen.

*CS Lewis, Mere Christianity (New York: HarperOne, 1950) 117.

**Ibid.  

***”Where Shall My Wondering Soul Begin,” The United Methodist Hmynal, 342.

 

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