Longing for Spring: Reports from the Horizon

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Philippians 2:1-13

My morning routine follows thusly: (1) Wake up before the alarm sounds (2) Listen to my pups yawn and stir (3) Scroll through the day’s headlines (4) Pray.

The first headline I saw this morning? Reports of another earthquake in Nepal. Once again the aching feelings of fear and loss coursed through my heart. I shared the news with Andrew and he lamented how the Nepali people cannot seem to catch a break. One of my yoga instructors is currently in Nepal helping with relief efforts. My thoughts immediately went to Beth and prayers ascended for her safety. She was assisting with a surgery consultation when the earthquake struck (I know – yoga instructor and certified firefighter/paramedic with specialized training in rural and wilderness medicine – she’s amazing!). She and her team are okay. They will continue to serve in the mounting devastation. And they serve with hope.

Many of you have asked if we have an update on our driver Ramesh. We do not. Please continue to pray for him, his family, and all of the beautiful Nepali people.

Halfway through our trip Andrew and I took a bus ride to Pokhara, which is in Western Nepal – about 200km (or 125mi) from Kathmandu. It should be said that when Andrew and I drive an-y-where we get in the car and do not stop till we are out of gas. Well, that is not how Nepali’s travel. They travel in the posture of the Hobbits from Lord of the Rings. They stop for first breakfast, and second breakfast, and a bathroom break, and gas, and eight hours later you arrive at your destination. Oh Nepali bus rides…

Pokhara is home to one of Nepal’s largest fresh water lakes – Phewa Lake – and is a great look out point to view the Annapurna range of the Himalayas. We were hopeful in traveling to Pokhara that we would actually see the Himalayas. The first day in Pokhara was dismal…cloudy and rainy…and no mountains to be seen. We spent most of the day in a trekking hotel sending wishes heavenward that the clouds would break just for a few moments.

Andrew splurged on our room in Pokhara…$15 each night for a room with a view…and as I looked out the windows of our room toward the horizon I spied this.

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Sitting up on a “grassy hill” overlooking Phewa Lake is a World Peace Pagoda. This pagoda was built under the direction of Nichidatsu Fujii, a Buddhist monk from Japan. He was greatly inspired after meeting Mahatma Ghandi in 1931 and decided then to devote his life to promoting ahimsa, a Sanskrit word meaning non-violence. In 1947 he began constructing World Peace Pagodas around the world. His hope was that these pagodas would serve as symbols to inspire peace and be places where people of all races and creeds could unite in presence and heart in seeking world peace.

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In the style of traditional Buddhist stupas this peace pagoda has four images of the Buddha facing the four cardinal directions. It is a solid structure.  Patrons and guests of the pagoda are not meant to go inside of it; they are invited to prayerfully walk around the stupa in a clockwise path. While upon this elevated space patrons and guests can look out across the horizon, admire its beauty, give thanks to their Creator, and send prayers and thoughts of peace to all the patrons of the world.

In our Scripture lesson for this week Paul encourages us to “do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility regard others as better than yourselves. Let each of you look not to your own interests, but to the interests of others” (Phil 2:3-4). When we turn our attention to the interests of others we become other-focused rather than self-focused. The World Peace Pagoda was built in Nepal not for people to look inside it but for people to stand around it and look into the world. This structure invites people to look not to themselves but to others with hopes for peace, growth, flourishing, and life.

I cannot think of an image more fitting for the Nepali people this day and for all of God’s people everywhere. When we look towards the horizons in our lives, what do we see? Do we see devastation or do we see delight? Or do we choose not to see the devastation so that we only see the delight? To flourish as Christ’s Body on earth, to strengthen God’s coming Kingdom we must come alongside our neighbors in their time of need. We must add our hands, hearts, and voices to God’s mighty work of transformation from destruction to delight.

Our God is a life-giving God. We are God’s children. We must add our hands, hearts, and voices to God’s mighty work of transformation. We must do it today.

Prayer: “Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console, to be understood as to understand, to be loved as to love; for it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying to self that we are born to eternal life.”* Amen.

*The Prayer of St. Francis.

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