FAMILY ~ All Means All

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Galatians 3:23-29.

She arrived on a wind from the East. Michael thought she was a witch. Jane knew better; witches fly on brooms, not with umbrellas.

Why is she here? Because the Banks’ children excel at nanny resignations. Their most recent conquest? Nanny resignation by following a kite.

The kite in Mary Poppins becomes a very powerful symbol. To Mr. Banks, father to Jane and Michael, the kite is a symbol of childishness and a need to grow up. To Michael, the kite is a symbol of playfulness and freedom, which are two qualities that are hard to come by in the Banks’ home. Within the walls of Number 17 Cherry Tree Lane children are not meant to be children, but little adults.

One day Mary Poppins announces the children will join their father on an outing to the bank where he works. The children nearly collapse of amazement because their father never takes them anywhere. When the children return to reality, sensitivity to their impending boredom arrives. Mary Poppins, in her wisdom, sweetens the deal, “Children, you could take a tuppence to feed the birds.”

Bird feeding is not on Mr. Banks’ agenda. Bird feeding is childish and wasteful spending of money. Guided by his father, and encouraged by his father’s coworkers, Michael hears, “Come, young man, grow up and be responsible. Invest your tuppence in the bank.” Nearly convinced to invest, Mr. Dawes, Sr. – the bank owner – abruptly takes the money from Michael’s hand, which angers Michael greatly. Michael’s determination to retrieve his money turns the bank into a zoo.

Mr. Banks’ job is now in jeopardy because of the tuppence fiasco. Heart and mind heavy with burden, Mr. Banks receives care from an unexpected place. Michael gives the fiasco-causing tuppence to his father as a sign of faith that it will help fix the situation at the bank, as a sign of belief in his father. Michael gives to his father – simply, beautifully – in a child-like way to help heal an adult-sized problem. This gift brings into focus the true adult-sized problem in Mr. Banks’ life – his desire to forcibly mature his children rather than support them and grow with them through relationship.

Mr. Banks puts down the tuppence and goes in search of Michael’s kite; he mends it so the family can fly it. The Banks’ growing and maturing in mutually beneficial ways – growing and maturing together – was of most importance. And they returned to this essential work by flying a kite.

//

When I read this passage from Paul, particularly the opening verses, I am struck by the image of growing in faith together. There are definitely lessons that are passed down from older generations to newer generations. There are definitely lessons that are passed up from newer generations to older generations. And there are definitely lessons that we all learn together.

In Christ we are all children of God. In faith we grow together…not so much into “adults” of God…but more so into “maturing” children of God. This maturing continues throughout our lives. It is not a forced maturation like what Mr. Banks wanted originally for his children. If our maturation in faith was forced, then we might rush through or all together disregard a lesson or time in our lives where we and our faith need time to explore and develop.

I worry when I encounter circumstances that pit mature faith against a child-like faith or picture a mature faith as superior to child-like faith. I believe we need both qualities present in our faith. As we mature in our relationship with Christ, as we mature in years, as we mature in our abilities to reason and research, we mature in our ability to argue, to defend, to question, and to prove. At times this ability to reason and research is helpful…and at other times all it does is make the waters more muddy. It is in these moments that our child-like faith serves us well to simply believe, rest, be at peace.

Simply be.

In Christ we are all children of God together. While each of us are at different places in our relationship with Christ, collectively we are all in relationship with Christ together. This is one of God’s mysteries – we are all in different places, but somehow all in the same place through community. This is a gift to us – to be with Christ as we are with one another – to learn, to play, to be challenged, to be supported, to mature in faith by growing in responsibility, and to mature in faith by flying a great number of kites.

Friends, let’s commit to doing this work – as God’s children – all of us.

Together.

Prayer: “One bread, one body, one Lord of all, one cup of blessing which we bless. And we, though many throughout the earth, we are one body in this one Lord. Gentile or Jew, servant or free, woman or man, no more. Many the gifts, many the works, one in the Lord of all. Grain for the fields, scattered and grown, gathered to one, for all. One bread, one body, one Lord of all, one cup of blessing which we bless. And we, though many throughout the earth, we are one body in this one Lord.”* Amen.

*”One Bread, One Body,” The United Methodist Hymnal 620.

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