Community Instruction

Sunday’s Scripture ~ I Timothy 2:1-7

For there is one God; there is also one mediator between God and humankind, Christ Jesus, himself human, who gave himself a ransom for all (I Tim 2:5-6).

There is an abundance of theology packed into this credal statement from the Early Church.

  • There is one God
    • A statement affirming monotheism – the belief in one deity, rather than
    • Polytheism – the belief in many deities or
    • Henotheism – the belief in one deity with an allowance for other deities in a hierarchy under the lead deity.
  • One mediator between God and humankind, Christ Jesus
    • A statement affirming that Christ Jesus proceeded from the one God, and is of the same substance with the one God, to be the physical, tangible, living, breathing, dying, saving link between God and humanity.
    • Christ Jesus is not a separate deity under God; they are the same, just as the Holy Spirit is the same with them. Together those three – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – are the Trinity – One God in three persons.
    • The need for Christ Jesus to be our mediator indicates a rupture in our relationship with God. This rupture is caused by sin and we cannot fix our sickness with sin on our own. We need God’s power and God’s power is available to us in Jesus.
  • Himself human – A statement affirming the humanness of Jesus.
    • We believe that Jesus has two natures; he is fully human and fully divine.
      • As fully human Jesus is able to stand in humanity’s place and take the punishment for sin.
      • As fully divine Jesus as God incarnate can save humanity from its condemned state due to sin and break the power of sin over humanity.
    • Jesus did not ‘appear’ human or ‘appear’ divine as some speculated; he was God incarnate.
  • Gave himself as a ransom for all – A statement affirming that our sins are atoned for through Jesus’ death and resurrection.
    • Through atonement we are made at one with God once again.
    • Hebrews 2:14-18 describes Jesus atoning actions writing, “Since, therefore, the children [humanity] share flesh and blood, he himself [Jesus] likewise shared the same things, so that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and free those who all their lives were held in slavery by the fear of death. For it is clear that he did not come to help angels, but the descendants of Abraham. Therefore he had to become like his brothers and sisters in every respect, so that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in the service of God, to make a sacrifice of atonement for the sins of the people. Because he himself was tested by what he suffered, he is able to help those who are being tested.”

Most theological education took place through oral tradition in the Ancient World and in the Early Church. Much of the society had very little or no formal education; so, learning occurred through telling the same stories or lessons repeatedly to help all members of the community – children by age and children at heart – commit them to memory and behavior.

The more ‘meaty’ the statement, the more learning to be ‘digested’ and ‘converted into lived energy’ for each individual. 

The above credal statement contains 25 words. If you were to write a credal statement for your faith using only 25 words, what would your credal statement say? What concepts would you include? What teaching would you name? Spend some of your devotional time this week writing your statement and then share it with someone. 

My credal statement reads:

God created out of chaos. God created Jesus to atone the chaos. God creates out of my chaos. God forgives our chaos. We are redeemed. 

Prayer: “Have thine own way, Lord. Have thine own way. Thou art the potter; I am the clay. Mold me and make me after thy will, while I am waiting, yielded and still. Have thine own way, Lord. Have thine own way. Search me and try me, Savior today! Wash me just now, Lord, wash me just now, as in thy presence humbly I bow.”* Amen.

“Have Thine Own Way, Lord,” The United Methodist Hymnal, 382.

Community Example

Sunday’s Scripture ~ I Timothy 1:12-17.

“Hi, folks…what seems to be going on?”

An innocent, calm question, until it is asked by a sheriff deputy.

“My wife’s the pastor!” Andrew said. “Hi, my name is Sarah. What brings you by this evening?”

“I am on patrol and I saw you turn into the church driveway. I thought I would give you a couple of minutes, in case you were in the sheds, and then I would come and find you in the act.”

“Oh, well we were just picking up mail from the office and disposing of some smelly trash from the parsonage. I appreciate you coming to check on us. And I appreciate you looking out for the security of our church.”

Lessons learned:

  1. We are blessed with great first responders and law enforcement in Seminole County.
  2. Maybe I shouldn’t pick up mail from the office at 10:24pm.

“Hi, folks…what seems to be going on?” If this question were asked of Paul in his first letter to Timothy, I believe Paul would say with joy that the “foremost” of sinners had been shown mercy and therefore he will show and share mercy in all times, in all circumstances, with all people (1:15). Though Paul was raised in “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” climate, Christ’s mercy molded him into a person that “turned the other cheek” (Mt 5:38-39). Through the example of Paul we learn that if Christ could and did shepherd Paul through such an incredible transformation, then Christ can and will shepherd incredible transformation in our community.

Christ can and will shepherd incredible transformation in us.

When I consider “what seems to be going on” at Tuskawilla, I am so pleased by the balance of our ministry and witness. We understand and continue growing in our understanding that as we do for our church family, so we are called to do for our surrounding community. And what we do for our surrounding community we do in the spirit as if we are serving our church family. This sort of behavior and understanding of needful, equivalent behavior is not always common in churches. Some congregations “like who we like” and others…oh well. Not so at Tuskawilla. Not so with this church family. I truly believe we act the way we do in response to our having experienced Christ’s mercy as individuals and as a congregation. As we have received, so we are led to give, which is in keeping with the teaching of Christ, “for the measure you give will be the measure you get back” (Lk 6:38c).

If you were caught in the act of being a Christ follower, if someone happened upon you engaging in Kingdom work and asked “Hi, folks…what seems to be going on?” what would you be found doing? How would you respond to the question? And what story would your response witness about your life in God’s Kingdom?

Prayer: “Immortal, invisible, God only wise, in light inaccessible hid from our eyes, most blessed, most glorious, the Ancient of Days, almighty, victorious, thy great name we praise. To all, life thou livest, to both great and small; in all life thou livest, the true life of all; we blossom and flourish as leaves on the tree, and wither and perish, but naught changeth thee.”* Amen.

*”Immortal, Invisible, God Only Wise,” The United Methodist Hymnal 103.

 

FAMILY ~ It Begins With YOU

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Acts 2:38-47.

This week Andrew and I had the opportunity to return to some of our “old stomping grounds.” No, we were not in Polk County, but that is a great place, too! We were in the greater Atlanta area visiting dear family and friends, eating practically everything in sight, and reminiscing about our time spent here while in seminary at Candler School of Theology at Emory University.

I may have also been bitten by the Doctorate of Ministry bug…but we will talk more about that later.

It is good to visit “home” or “the homes” throughout our lives because those occasions help us to reflect on how things were and how things have changed, and how we were and how we have changed. Going home is as much a physical visit as it is a spiritual and emotional visit. It draws me to a time of reflection as well as gratitude. Yes, somethings change – people who used to live or work in certain places are no longer there, buildings that were once used for one thing are now used for another purpose, praising God that one section of road construction is finally completed only to find that they have simply moved the construction two miles north.

And yes, somethings stay the same and get better with age – hospitality, kindness, generosity, curiosity, encouragement, and love.

This Sunday in the Christian Year we return home to Pentecost – the birth of the Early Church through the giving and receiving of the Holy Spirit. In returning to this home we are reminded of how things were and how things have changed and how we as God’s people were and how we as God’s people have changed. I am so thankful for the legacy from our Pentecost home that remains and sustains – worship, confession, gathering around Christ’s table in fellowship, thanksgiving, acts of mercy, acts of justice, service, companionship, and transformation. I am thankful for the ways our legacy from our Pentecost home has changed, morphed, and evolved through the generations. And I am hopeful for how we will continue shaping our legacy as a family of faith through our relationship with and response to the leadings of the Holy Spirit.

I invite you to join me in prayer for the continued shaping of our legacy as a United Methodist faith family as the voting at General Conference begins on Monday, May 16. I am hopeful that decisions made by this elective body and voice of our denomination recall our home in Pentecost – the mighty presence of God and the immediate, authentic, inclusive response to God’s presence in our midst – as they add their heads, hearts, and hands to the shaping of the United Methodist witness in the world for the next four years.

Gracious Lord, may hospitality, kindness, generosity, curiosity, encouragement, and love define United Methodists and our witness. May people see your face, your light, and your welcome in us.

Prayer“Wind who makes all winds that blow, gusts that bend the sapling low, gales that heave the sea in waves, stirrings in the mind’s deep caves: aim your breath with steady power on your church, this day, this hour. Raise, renew the life we’ve lost, Spirit God of Pentecost.”* Amen.

*”Wind Who Makes All Winds That Blow,”The United Methodist Hymnal” 538.

FAMILY ~ Lead From The Heart

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Matthew 28:16-20

The final class standing between me completing my undergraduate dual religion and philosophy degree was Logic. And all I can say is this:

I wish I had taken a course in Logic before I took tenth grade Geometry. Proofs would have made SO much more sense.

For me the goal of solving any logic problem is arriving at the three dots in the shape of a triangle at the end of the problem. These three dots in the shape of a triangle represent the therefore that immediately precedes the logical consequence – or result – of the logic problem. These three dots in the shape of a triangle also mean the end of this logic problem is at hand!

Some logic problems are quite simple and therefore quite brief. Given that each of the following premises are true…

  1. All schnauzers are canines.
  2. Samson is a schnauzer.
  3. Therefore Samson is a canine.

Or

  1. All A are B.
  2. C is an A.
  3. Therefore C is a B.

Other logic problems, however, involve an entire soup worth of alphabet letters in order to get to the therefore.

For this reason logic equations always seemed a little one-sided to me. All the work was on the front end of the therefore. By the time I arrived at those three dots in the shape of a triangle, true, I was ready to execute my logical consequence…but that was where the work ended. The equation concluded. No more work was to be done.

In some ways Jesus provides an alphabet soup worth of letters before arriving at his Great Therefore – or Great Commission – in Matthew 28. As in logic equations, all our evidence, instruction, and examples precede the therefore. Teachings. Feedings. Healings. Miracles. Declarations that Jesus is God’s Son. Foretellings that Jesus will suffer, die, and rise on the third day. Witnesses to the resurrection.  And then we reach the long awaited therefore only to find the sequence continues.

Thereforego.

  1. Go and make.
  2. Go and baptize.
  3. Go and teach.
  4. Go and obey.

Not therefore go. as in we stop at the period that follows the o. Rather therefore go and actually go. Move. Respond. Serve. Do all of these things. And in doing all of these things – making, baptizing, teaching, and obeying – you will be anything but stationary and God’s Kingdom will be anything but stationary.

Jesus’ therefore leads into a consequence that calls us into action. Through our service we continue his service. Through our witness we strengthen his witness. This is a privilege. This is an honor. This is holy work. And this is our work.

Jesus has delivered his therefore. How will you live into your go?

Prayer: “Go, make of all disciples.” We hear the call, O Lord, that comes from thee, our Father, in thy eternal Word. Inspire our ways of learning through earnest, fervent prayer, and let our daily living reveal thee everywhere.”* Amen.

*”Go, Make of All Disciples,” The United Methodist Hymnal 571.