A Special Treat

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Luke 19:1-10 (Morningsong) and 1 Samuel 17 (11am Blended Worship)

On Monday Andrew and I took his brother, Josh, a pumpkin. Josh is interred at the Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell and Halloween was (is) his favorite holiday. Oh the mischief Andrew and Josh would cause on Halloween.

One Halloween they kept changing their costumes – full wardrobe changes at first and then only minor changes towards the end – as they revisited the same house again and again. Why that house? Four words: full.size.candy.bars.

Andrew and Josh did not start out as friends. They started out having a fist fight…and then they became friends. And once they were friends, the two were instantly brothers. If you were to ask my in-laws or Josh’s parents, I am sure they would say that a common phrase between Andrew and Josh was “I am coming to your house today!” To hang out, to sleep over, to build something in the garage, to scheme the next prank, to plot resistance against “the man” (whatever or whoever “the man” was that week), to laugh, to live. “I am coming to your house today.”

Wherever Josh was, there Andrew would be and vice versa.

My heart breaks because Andrew cannot have those experiences with Josh right now…but that will not be the case forever. We trust, we believe faithfully that God is bringing us all – bringing them – together again.

Jesus shocked the crowd when he announced that he was going to Zacchaeus’ house. Perhaps some hoped that Jesus was going there to “clean house” or spare Zacchaeus the public ridicule and shame of being rebuked by the Savior before his peers. But that was not Jesus’ intent. Jesus’ intent was to build community and include rather than further exclude the tax collector. Jesus wanted Zacchaeus, who had been so far from Jesus as evidenced by his behavior, to come near to him. Zacchaeus, this tax collector, this culturally despised man, this swindler, this con – Jesus had so many reasons to come to blows with this man. And yet Jesus does not throw a fist, but offers a hand. “I am coming to your house today.”

Jesus said, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it” (Lk 8:21). Through his repentance and reconciliation – through admitting his wrong and repaying his neighbors – Zacchaeus turned his will towards the Father’s and embraced his kinship with Jesus.

We visit Josh to remember. We visit Josh so that Andrew and Josh can hang out. We visit Josh so Andrew can tell him what has been built in the garage, report on completed pranks, update resistance plans, and laugh. We visit Josh as an act of living and leave Josh’s side with a renewed sense of calling: Who will we invite to our house today? What homes will we ask to enter? What new and continuing relationships will we nurture? How will we see Christ in others and invite them to see Christ in us?

Remember this Sunday’s treat: Join me for the 8:30 Morningsong Service and then plan to stay for worship at 11am as Andrew preaches on David and Goliath from I Samuel. I am looking forward to my time at both Tusakwilla and Azalea Park UMCs this weekend! The Millers are excited to see you in worship on Sunday!

Prayer: “Called forth from every nation, yet one o’er all the earth; our charter of salvation: one Lord, one faith, one birth. One holy name professing and at one table fed, to one hope always pressing, by Christ’s own Spirit led.” Amen.

*”The Church’s One Foundation,” The United Methodist Hymnal 546.

From Wreck to Restoration: God Invites Us Into The New Covenant

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Jeremiah 31:27-34.

We conclude our sermon series From Wreck to Restoration this Sunday with God Invites Us Into The New Covenant. I preached this Scripture passage for my ordination sermon; I vowed after studying this passage extensively and preparing this passage for preaching for over four months that I would never again preach this passage.

Never say “never,” right?

I selected this text for my ordination sermon because I felt the nudge of the Holy Spirit guiding me towards it. I attempted to work on one of the other recommended texts and God continued to draw my heart back to this declaration of the new covenant. There is such grace in this text. There is such love and hope. We will know the Lord. God will forgive our wrongdoings and never again remember our sins.

We all have moments in our lives that we would rather not to remember – how we hurt someone we loved, how we walked away instead of standing up, how we said something we did not mean or remained silent when our words would have made all the difference, how we did harm in some way instead of doing good, how we experienced deep suffering and agony. I would like to permanently forget those moments and some days I think I have…until something happens that reminds me of my wrongdoings and the weight of my past actions comes crashing down all over again.

In those moments I feel truly wrecked, which leads me to question – am I able to be made whole, am I able to be forgiven, am I even worth it?

The answer to those questions is yes. What may be unexpected is that I did not have to come to that answer on my own. I received that answer from God through God’s invitational love and mercy. I believe we all receive that answer from God through God’s invitational love and mercy.

In full knowledge of our sin, God invites us into the new covenant. God forgives and remembers no more. God invites us to know God and to be fully known by God. When we answer God’s invitation and live into the new covenant, God’s Law will be written on our hearts. Rather than something learned, God’s instruction will be innate, as near to us as our breath, and that which guides the pulse of our lives.

This past week I had the privilege to hear two separate testimonies of restoration in the same setting. Two persons both shared their struggles with clinical depression, of feeling hopeless, and of desperately wanting to feel anything at all. They spoke of the loneliness and the shame. They spoke of considering every possible means of finding relief…

Those two people – two of my friends – have experienced and continue to experience God’s restoration. I am privileged to know them and to watch them offer their talents in the service of God and others. I am privileged to learn from them and to laugh with them. I consider it a great privilege to look at their lives – to look at them – and see the evidence of God saying yes

Yes, my child, you are forgiven.

Yes, my child, you are made whole.

Yes, my child, you are worth it. 

God says yes to us and welcomes us to life in the new covenant. However we are wrecked, God welcomes us to restoration in him. Our saying “yes” to God may happen in an instant. It may happen over a lifetime. It may be once and for all. It may be said again and again. I think of utmost importance is that we say “yes” to God’s invitation into the new covenant and that our lives are the proof of our saying “yes.”

Prayer:”I stand amazed in the presence of Jesus the Nazarene, and wonder how he could love me, a sinner, condemned, unclean. He took my sins and my sorrows, he made them his very own; he bore the burden to Calvary, and suffered and died alone. How marvelous! How wonderful! And my song shall ever be: How marvelous! How wonderful is my Savior’s love for me!”

*”I Stand Amazed in the Presence,” The United Methodist Hymnal 371.

From Wreck to Restoration: God Wants Us To Live

Sunday’s Scripture – Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7.

A month ago I met with the family of Floyd Jacobs to plan his celebration of life. In all celebrations of life the key moments are Scripture passages, persons that share a witness of the loved one gone onto glory, and music. When our conversation shifted to music Margie said, “There’s a song the choir sings, but I cannot remember what it is called. I would like them to sing that one.”

To which I said, “Absolutely!”

(And then I called Tim!)

With the help of the choir we discovered the name of the song Margie wanted sung for Floyd; it is called “Untitled Hymn.” And the refrain of each stanza is imbued with hope:

Come to Jesus and live

Sing to Jesus and live 

Fall on Jesus and live

Cry to Jesus and live

Dance for Jesus and live

Fly to Jesus and live 

When I reflect on the verbs that drive these closing stanzas – come, sing, fall, cry, dance, and fly – I see John Wesley’s description of the via Salutis or way of salvation:

  • When we become aware of the presence of the Holy Spirit’s movement in our lives, we hear God say to us, Come.
  • When we are justified in Christ, we can say – or even Sing! – to Jesus for his love, mercy, and grace. 
  • Though we are justified and made new in Christ, we are still susceptible to sin; we continue sinning. When we sin, we Fall. Wesley calls this activity “backsliding.” And when we fall – thank the Lord we fall on Jesus. In his arms or leaning against his cross we Cry. And as we weep, I believe Jesus places his hand gently under our chins to lift our eyes to his and to lift our spirits to redemption. 
  • As we grow in holiness, as Jesus sanctifies us, we Dance with Jesus and one another. Our feet are guided by his Spirit throughout the Kingdom. We dance not to be seen, but so that others will want to join God’s dance, too. 
  • And as we continue on in this life and move towards life on the other side of eternity, friends, we Fly to Jesus as we grow in Christian perfection. In our life with Jesus we are made perfect just as our God is perfect (Mt 5:48). 

With all of these verbs from “Untitled Hymn” – and in each moment along the via Salutis – we are invited to live. 

God wants us to live. 

Take a moment to check in with yourself. Where would you locate yourself along the via Salutis? Or what verb from “Untitled Hymn” would you select to describe how you are presently living your life with God? How do your answers sit with your soul? In what ways do you sense God inviting you to new life?

Remember we will gather as a church family for a congregational meeting to discuss our needed capital improvements this Sunday, October 16 immediately following worship.

You are also invited to join with our church family on Saturday, October 15 for our Prayer Vigil in preparation for Sunday’s congregational meeting. The Sanctuary will be open from 9am – 9pm and prayer resources will be available.

I am thankful to live life with God and to live life with you at Tuskawilla.  

Prayer: “I am no longer my own, but thine. Put me to what thou wilt, rank me with whom thou wilt. Put me to doing, put me to suffering. Let me be employed by thee or laid aside for thee, exalted for thee or brought low for thee. Let me be full, let me be empty. Let me have all things, let me have nothing. I freely and heartily yield all things to thy pleasure and disposal. And now, O Glorious and blessed God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, Thou art mine, and I am thine. So be it. And the covenant which I have made on earth, let it be ratified in heaven. Amen.”*

*”A Covenant Prayer in the Wesleyan Tradition,” The United Methodist Hymnal 607.

From Wreck to Restoration: God Shapes Us

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Jeremiah 18:1-11.

In a farewell to summer before school resumed I joined my dear friend, Holly, and her son, Gage, at the beach one afternoon. There is something so soothing about the sound of crashing waves upon the beach. 

After several rounds of cards and watching Olympic Beach Volleyball, we headed down to the beach ourselves. Gage, in his creativity, wonder, and joy said, “Let’s build sandcastles!”

Now growing up a native Floridian, I spent many a summer day on the beach, but I have not built that many sandcastles. Gage and Holly are experts. We built a pyramid-shaped castle, complete with a mote. We built a drip castle. And then we set about our biggest endeavor – a sandcastle in the shape of a turtle. 

Yes – a turtle. 

Our assignments: Holly – sculptor | Gage – water | Sarah – sand

With great ease and steady hands Holly modeled a sea turtle out of that mound of sand. First the shell, then the flippers, then the head, and lastly a little tail. Holly took care in shaping each piece and didn’t move on until every grain was just so. 

Then, Gage invited me to crosshatch the shell – pressure. So much pressure.  

It was incredible to stand back and admire our work. The turtle would remain until the tide returned and would begin its own sculpting to smooth some of the mounded sand and take others back into the Atlantic. While our turtle will be gone the materials remain for the next group of friends to come and create.

I am thankful that just as we had the opportunity to shape the sand into our creations, God continues God’s shaping of us in our lives throughout our lives. God builds us up, God smooths us out, God gathers us, God separates us.

God shapes us for a particular task. Then, God shapes us again.

God’s shaping comes through our stewardship – through our prayers, presence, gifts, service, and witness. God’s shaping comes through our interaction with Scripture – through our study and response. God’s shaping comes through the hands of the Holy Spirit and through the hands of our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Sometimes we are ready for God’s shaping and at other times it catches us by surprise. Sometimes we are hungry for God’s shaping and at other times we wish God would pass by us. God’s shaping is part of our sanctification, part of our life and living in holiness. We may not want it, but we need it. We may not welcome it, but we are better for it. God will not force God’s shaping upon us; this shaping is part of God’s gift of grace and desires us to accept it.

I encourage you to find your way to some sand this week. Spend some time shaping and creating. Feel the grains of sand in between your fingers. Gather and separate the sand. Build it up and smooth it again. Think of how you have experienced and received God’s shaping in your life. Give thanks and prepare – for God’s shaping and for the shaping that God will do.

Keep our brothers and sisters in Haiti, Cuba, the Bahamas, throughout Florida and along the Southeast Atlanta Coast in your prayers in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. Please stay safe and check in on one another.

Prayer: “Take my life, and let it be concreted, Lord, to thee. Take my moments and my days, let them flow in ceaseless praise. Take my hands, and let them move at the impulse of thy love. Take my feet, and let them be swift and beautiful for thee.”* Amen.

*”Take My Life, And Let It Be,” The United Methodist Hymnal 399.