Mountain Meditation: Don’t Worry; Be Mindful

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Matthew 6:24-34.

If there were a prize for worrying…I would be worried that I would not receive the prize.

Can you relate?

In the right doses worrying can help us. Worrying can alert  us to dangers. Worrying may contribute to (prod…instigate…motivate) our decision making practices. Worrying can move us from inactivity to activity.

On the other hand, worrying can become obsessive and incapacitating. Worrying can crescendo the feeling of being overwhelmed to the feeling of being completely paralyzed.

In his book What is the Opposite of Worry Dr. Lawrence J. Cohen names three powerful antidotes to worry:

  1. Being held in loving arms,
  2. Cultivating a soothing inner voice, and
  3. Befriending all of your emotions.

When I was in high school I spent many Sundays serving in the church nursery with many of First Lakeland’s youngest worshippers. One boy I remember in particular, his name is Zachary, would cry unconsolably when his mother brought him to the nursery – new place, new people, no Mama. We would try every trick in the book to engage (distract) Zachary with a toy, stuffed animal, or book. Not interested. And so the caregivers would take turns holding him close to our chests. With time his accelerated heart beat would slow as he listened to and felt the caregiver’s heartbeat. He would cry into the crook of the caregiver’s neck until he felt safe enough to peek out into the room. And then we would watch his progression from peeking out his gaze, to lifting his head, to wanting to be turned around to face the room, to leaving the caregiver’s lap to play on the floor. Zachary had every right to worry, but his time spent in loving arms assured him that Mama would be back soon, that he was safe, and that it was, in fact, okay for him to have a little fun without her.

From being held in loving arms and hearing soothing voices I believe we develop soothing inner voices. We learn how to self-comfort. We learn how to have a moment of being out of control and then safely coming back into control. But to find and raise up our personal voices, it is vital that we hear soothing voices. That we hear we are beloved. That we hear we are cherished. That we hear we are made in the image of God and that makes us worthy and special. That we hear that nothing can take away God’s love from us. I believe one of the best pieces of advice given to John Wesley was this, “Preach faith until you have it, and because you have it, preach faith.” The same principal applies here, “Say the words of a soothing inner voice – for yourself and others – until you have it, and because you have it, say these words.”

Having a soothing and rational inner voice (I know – I know…it may take a while to hear the rational side, but it is important, too) creates a platform for us to draw near to all of our emotions. We are complex beings. We feel and experience along a huge spectrum! I do not think it is helpful to call some feelings and emotions good and others bad because all of them sum up who we are. Rather, if we are able to connect with each of our feelings – to understand them as well as our responses and reactions to them – we learn endurance. We gain perspective. We learn from the past moments as we look forward to the future.

These combined antidotes – being held in loving arms, cultivating a soothing inner voice, and befriending all your emotions – leads to what Cohen calls practicing mindfulness. The practice of mindfulness, argues Cohen, is the opposite of worry. Sort of like Tai Chi where the flow of energy is received and immediately redirected somewhere else rather than internalized, so we should approach worry: recognize the circumstance, feel what is felt, name it, respond to it, if appropriate, and then let it go so you are prepared for what may be coming next.

I believe Cohen rightly calls mindfulness a practice. It takes time to develop. It takes intentional behavior and commitment. And I believe it yields great peace – the kind of peace that passes all understanding.

Join us this Sunday as Samantha Aupperlee shares a message with us on this Scripture passage and topic! Thank you, Samantha, for sharing your leadership in worship!

Prayer: “O come and sing this song with gladness as your hearts are filled with joy. Lift your hands in sweet surrender to his name. O give him all your tears and sadness; give him all your years of pain, and you’ll enter into life in Jesus’ name. Jesus, O Jesus, come and fill your lambs. Jesus, O Jesus, come and fill your lambs.”* Amen.

*”Spirit Song ,” The United Methodist Hymnal 347.

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