Giving Up: Superiority

Sunday’s Scripture ~ John 4:5-26.

One of our earliest lessons as children is learning opposites, and in learning opposites, we learn to identify differences.

The opposite of up is down. The opposite of left is right. The opposite of yes is no. The opposite of stop is go.

Opposites are not bad. Identifying differences is not bad. What has the potential to be bad is if or when we allow opposites and identifying differences to seed and fertilize feelings of superiority – that one side, opinion, or belief is better and therefore superior to another.

How fascinated we are in drawing artificial lines between us. These lines can be used to set ourselves apart – to identify ourselves from what we are and what we are not, to recognize a given position of leadership or achievement. But when these identifications or recognitions feed into a system where “never the twain shall meet” – meaning there is no opportunity for these two people or two groups of people (or more) to unite – this is indeed a problem.

Jesus was set apart. As Messiah, as God’s Son, he was different from his family, colleagues, and friends he met and served in his ministry. He was different, but he did not operate in the world of opposites and identified differences.

The opposite of Savior is sinnerThe opposite of King is commoner.

No. This is not our Jesus.

Jesus, full of grace and peace, met people where they were. He met them in their doubt, questioning, and uncertainty. Jesus crossed perceived lines that would keep unlikely people apart. He did not consider himself superior, even though he was and is God. Rather,   Jesus “emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death-even death on a cross” (Phil 2:7-8).

Jesus as God’s Son could have picked up his crown and not bothered with women, Samaritans, lepers, the blind, the lame, or outcasts of any sort. But our Jesus picked up a towel instead, wrapped it around his waist, and served. He served all people. He saved all people.

Jesus serves and saves still.

As Jesus crossed perceived lines of opposites and difference, so should we. He poured himself out and was never without; he was immediately filled again so he could continue in his service. We are filled with the Holy Spirit and will be replenished by that same Spirit whenever we share its power and graces with others. But to be with others – to meet them where they are – first means getting beyond ourselves. Beyond our own comfort zones. Beyond our own opinions. Beyond our own perceived ideas of superiority.

We must lay down any crowns we have fashioned so that we, too, can pick up a towel as is exampled for us by our Lord.

Prayer: “Thou art giving and forgiving, ever blessing, ever blest, well-spring of the joy of living, ocean depth of happy rest!  Thou our Father, Christ our brother, all who live in love are thine; teach us how to love each other, lift us to the joy divine. Mortals, join the mighty chorus which the morning stars began; love divine is reigning o’er us, binding all within its span. Ever singing, march we onward, victors in the midst of strife; joyful music leads us sunward, in the triumph song of life.”* Amen.

*”Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee,” The United Methodist Hymnal 89.

 

 

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