All Saints Celebration and Remembrance

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Hebrews 9:11-14.

On Saturday Andrew will preside at the celebration of life for two saints of Azalea Park UMC – Beverly and Harvey House. They went onto glory within days of one another. They both lived into their mid-eighties. They both finished well their courses in faith. They both loved one another and their families beyond description.

They both will be missed.

The first time I really sat down to speak with Harvey was at a UMW Picnic of all places. The Sunshine Circle has an annual picnic lunch at a local park; they invited Andrew to come and welcomed me as an extra guest.

(I cannot resist United Methodists and deviled eggs in a park pavilion!)

Harvey sat towards the back of the pavilion while Beverly joyfully served as a hostess, ensuring everyone had every possible choice and need fulfilled. Harvey had a quiet smile on his face as he watched Beverly serve. I asked him why he was smiling. He pointed to Beverly – her joy, her friendliness, her compassion, and her servant’s heart – and simply responded, “How could I not?”

“How could I not?”

When I think of the saints we will celebrate a Tuskawilla UMC in both our worship services this week, I join Harvey in smiling. These women and men – their service on both sides of eternity – are witnesses to our faith.

We miss the loved ones that are no longer physically near us. Somedays their place in our hearts is so empty and hollow…it is like the wound of grief will not ever heal. It is in these moments especially that we call to mind God’s faithfulness and the truth of God’s word:

Therefore, my friendslet us approach with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast to the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who has promised is faithful. And let us consider how to provoke one another to love and good deeds, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day approaching...Recall those earlier days when, after you had been enlightened, you endured a hard struggle with sufferings, sometimes being publicly exposed to abuse and persecution, and sometimes being partners with those so treated. For you had compassion for those who were in prison, and you cheerfully accepted the plundering of your possessions, knowing that you yourselves possessed something better and more lasting. Do not, therefore, abandon that confidence of yours; it brings a great reward. For you need endurance, so that when you have done the will of God, you may receive what was promised. For yet “in a very little while, the one who is coming will come and will not delay; but my righteous one will live by faith. My soul takes no pleasure in anyone who shrinks back.” But we are not among those who shrink back and so are lost, but among those who have faith and so are saved (Heb 10:19a, 22-25, 32-39). 

Do not abandon your confidence. Claim the Lord’s endurance – especially in the valley of the shadow of death. God will guide us through – God and the servant saints that smile on us as we continue our courses in faith.

We will honor the saints of the Tuskawilla UMC Family at both our worship services on Sunday. See you then.

Prayer: “For all the saints, who from their labors rest, who thee by faith before the world confessed, thy name, O Jesus, be forever blest. Alleluia, Alleluia!”* Amen.

*”For All The Saints,” The United Methodist Hymnal 711.

 

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Longing for Spring: What New Methodists Want

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Luke 10:1-12

Our Scripture text for this week has the image of hospitality as a primary focal point. The seventy – who are commissioned by Jesus to take his Good News through and to all the nations – will know that their message is received and accepted in households if they receive hospitality from the household. This hospitality would take the form of welcoming them indoors, providing them with food and water, inviting them to rest their weary feet from their travels. “Peace to this house!” will be the seventy’s salutation and if peace – in the form of hospitality is not given – the seventy are to continue on their way (10:5). Their message remains consistent, “The Kingdom of God is near” (10:11). Even if they do not benefit from hospitality, their message remains hospitable. “Prepare, my fellow citizens of earth. God’s Kingdom is coming. And you are invited to be a part of it.”

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Temples outside of Mother Theresa’s home in Kathmandu, Nepal. Her home is now used as a hospital, hospice, and care center of aging Nepalis. Mother Theresa understood Christ’s lesson of hospitality and peace so well. She is an example for us all. 

My heart continues to be heavy in the wake of the reports coming out of Nepal. I ache for the lives lost, for the historic and holy sites damaged and/or destroyed, and for the delay in delivering desperately needed relief supplies due to continued aftershocks and impassable roadways.

The Nepali people have a beautiful love for life and an incredible, innate sense of hospitality for their neighbors old and new.   Nepalis take every occasion to celebrate. In fact, my friends who worked in the Embassy said that recently the Embassy had to change their “paid vacation day” calendar, which typically follows not only American paid vacation days, but also the governmental and religious holy days recognized within that nation, because there are many weeks that for Nepalis they would not work at all! There was too much celebrating to be done!

When Nepalis celebrate, everyone is invited to the party. During our trip we had the opportunity to celebrate Holi, a Hindu spring festival celebrating color and love. At a Holi celebration there is music, dancing, delicious food and conversation. The day typically ends with a colored-dye water fight. The powered dyes are brightly colored and when mixed with water become even more vibrant…so vibrant that they stain your skin for the next few days.

I safely observed this colored-dye fight from afar. We celebrated Holi on the side of a mountain, which was at an elevation of just under 9000ft…and the wind was blowing…and it was 65ish degrees. I reckon if I had joined the fight I would have become a Holi popsicle!

The family that invited us to their Holi celebration gifted us with incredible hospitality. For that afternoon, their home was our home and we were to be at home with them. We talked about every topic imaginable: politics: Nepali and American; economics: Nepali and American; cricket; the 2016 Olympics; religion; and that women can be ministers. The conversations were incredibly diverse in opinions, in life experiences, in knowledge base, and there was peace. We came together. We shared our hearts. We dialogued about our passions and our dreams. We became community and there was peace.

I remember walking down the mountain and turning to look back up to the home where we celebrated Holi and thinking, “Wow, what a sanctuary. This experience is holy. I am being made more holy because of it.”

As reports continue to come out of Nepal I hope I will learn about the safety of this family and the safety of our driver, Ramesh, and his family. I hope that reports of aftershocks cease because the ground stills. I hope that relief efforts are swift and that healing begins sooner rather than later so that the Nepali people can return to their love for and celebration of life.

There are many relief agencies receiving financial contributions at this time to help with the Nepali disaster recovery. I would once again lift up UMCOR – the United Methodist Committee on Relief – as one of these agencies. UMCOR operates on the principle that for every dollar given for relief efforts 100% of that dollar is spent in relief efforts. Nothing is taken out of that dollar for administrative fees or organizational overhead. If you would like to make a gift to UMCOR to help our brothers and sisters in Nepal, you may do so by visiting www.umcor.org, select the DONATE button in the top right corner, and select International Disaster Response. You may also give a contribution to Tuskawilla UMC and mark “UMCOR” on the memo and we will send in your support on behalf of the church.

The Nepali people are truly a people of peace. Our prayerful and financial support will greatly help them reestablish their peace of mind and peace in their homeland. The peace we give is rooted in the peace of Christ and it brings all measures of healing.

Prayer: “Lord, you give the great commission: Heal the sick and preach the word. Lest the church neglect its mission, and the gospel go unheard, help us witness to your purpose with renewed integrity. With the Spirit’s gifts empower us for the work of ministry. Lord, you call us to your service: In my name baptize and teach. That the world may trust your promise, life abundant meant for each, give us all new fervor, draw us closer in community. With the Spirit’s gifts empower us for the work of ministry.”* Amen.

*”Lord, You Give the Great Commission” The United Methodist Hymnal 584.

Jesus: The Early Years ~ Reverence

Sunday’s Scripture ~ John 2:1-11

This week concludes Reeves’ first unofficial 2013 sermon series.  I say unofficial because I didn’t intend Jesus: The Early Years to actually be a sermon series…it just sort of happened that way.  Love when the Spirit moves in ways that I never expect and makes greatness out of what most definitely would have been scatteredness.  Thanks be to God.

Jesus has been baptized and has crossed the threshold into his years of full-time ministry.  It is believed he served three years in ministry from the time of his baptism until his crucifixion.  According to the Fourth Gospel, the Wedding at Cana is his first public miracle.

One of my favorite capturings of the Weddings at Cana in reception history is from !Hero the Rock Opera.  Enjoy!

Yes…weddings in the Jewish culture in the time of Jesus were a big and widely attended.  They still are today.

And Jesus was in the midst of this one.  I can’t help but smile when I think about Jesus at a reception…what if Jesus gathered with all the fellas to catch the garter!?!  What if he helped heckle the groom as he went to retrieve said garter…

I can imagine Jesus with joy on his face as he sang the celebratory songs and participated in the traditional chair dances, as he ate, drank, and was merry.  I agree with Robert Brearley that “sometimes the church has forgotten that our Lord once attended a wedding feast and said yes to gladness and joy.  Prompted by his earthly mother, Jesus turned water into wine to point us to his heavenly Father, a God who loves to hear the laughter of people celebrating people.  Sometimes the church has forgotten to live the joy of such revelation.”*

In the Incarnation God inserted joy into brokenness through the Word made flesh in Jesus.  And in Cana God kept the joy overflowing – and the partying going – as Jesus turned water into wine.  What a testament this is that life is not about drudgery just waiting for the next ball to drop but that life is a ball and something worth living because of the God who gave and gives us life!

I am guilty of letting troubles weigh me down – in my personal life, in my church, in my community, in my country, in my world.  While in seminary my friend Dan and I took a course entitled Crisis Ministry and it seemed for a while that every chapter of every book we read began with a reference to Psalm 22 – “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”  It became a sort of inside joke for us…we felt forsaken because we continually had to read about our forsakenness…even though we were far from it.

Yes, my friends, we are far from it.  In the midst of troubles, God desires joy and works swiftly on our behalves to return us to moments of celebration.  God wants us to live in Cana.

God wants our lives to be one great big party.

With Jesus.

Prayer: Great God, you are the giver of all good things.  You gave us life to enjoy to the fullest and to give back to you in service and love.  When life gets in the way of that joy – when events turn our posture away from celebration to worry, to fear, to anger, to disgust – Lord, redeem our thoughts, soften our hearts, and empower our hands, our feet, our hearts, and our wills that together we work to return to celebration.  In joy we pray, Amen.

*Quote from David L. Bartlett and Barbara Brown Taylor, Feasting On the Word: Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary, Year C, Volume 1 (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2009), 260 and 262.