Heroes and Villains: Rahab

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Joshua 2:1-14

During my trip to Israel we spent one afternoon in the City of Jericho. We ate lunch in a restaurant attached to a shop called The Temptation Center. Alarming title…so much beautiful pottery! Outside The Temptation Center was a small staircase that pilgrims could climb to see a surviving portion of the Wall of Jericho. I remember climbing the staircase and hearing the Bible stories my mother told me as a child – of the people of Israel marching around the wall, of loud trumpet blasts and shouting, and of Rahab welcoming the spies into the safety of her home.

Some might consider the relationship between Rahab and the Israelite spies purely transactional. “I protected you; you protect me” akin to “I will scratch your back; you will scratch mine.” But I believe the relationship was deeper than that. Rahab knew the stories of the Israelite God. She feared God in awe and wonder not worry and dismay. She feared and revered God; she revered and believed. Welcoming the spies into her home was a sign of not only Rahab’s belief in the stories of the Israelite people and their God, but also of her personal acceptance of those stories and the person (deity) that sent the spies.

Recently a dear friend welcomed me into her home for dinner and fellowship. I knocked and the door was immediately opened. As always, I took off my shoes and walked around her house like I lived there. “Help yourself to whatever you need in the kitchen; open cabinets or drawers till you find it!” (whatever it may be). My friend made sure I was comfortable before she made herself comfortable. I did not have the feeling I had as a child sitting in my grandmother’s formal living room where I am convinced everyone hovered over the couches rather than sitting on them for fear of harming them. My friend heartily and joyously welcomed me. I was at peace. I was safe. I was at home.

Hospitality is a truly beautiful gift.

I learned the manner of hospitality that I practice – in the place I live, in the relationships I share, in the churches I serve – from my study of Scripture. Luke 6:38 reads “give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap; for the measure you give will be the measure you get back.” I hope that my expressions of hospitality tell the story of the one who sent and sends me – that our God is a welcoming God that provides, nurtures, loves, and forgives. Sometimes my hospitality takes a visible form – I am able to provide a service or fulfill a need. At other times my hospitality takes an invisible form – I listen, I hold space while someone weeps, I pray, I hope.

Of most importance is our understanding that God calls us to practice hospitality – not just for the people we like or the people like us – but for all people. From a 30,000ft view Rahab have nothing in common with the Israelite spies that entered the land of Canaan, but from a heart-view, Rahab and the spies share the common heritage of being created in the image of God. I believe from that common heritage she welcomed the spies and provided them sanctuary, and in turn, the Israelites remembered she and her family when they came into possession of the land.

…The measure you give will be the measure you get back…

Take some time this week to consider the hospitality you offer. Where did you learn your hospitality practices? What guides your practice of hospitality? What message or whose message do you send through your practice of hospitality?

Prayer: “As Christ breaks bread, and bids us share, each proud division ends. The love that made us, makes us one, and strangers now are friends, and strangers now are friends. And thus with joy we meet our Lord. His presence, always near, is in such friendship better known; we see and praise him here, we see and praise him here.”* Amen.

*“I Come With Joy,” The United Methodist Hymnal 617.

We Don’t Have To Go Home, But We Can’t Stay Here

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Luke 9:28-36

I returned from an eight day pilgrimage across Israel on Wednesday and a word that resonated with me and my fellow sojourners throughout our travels in the Holy Land was home.

We visited Bethlehem where the Holy Family had their home during Jesus’ infancy. We visited Nazareth where Jesus lived as a boy and youth and would eventually be expelled from because “no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s home town” (Lk 4:24). We visited Capernaum and journeyed throughout the Galilee where Jesus accomplished most of his ministry before he set his eyes on Jerusalem. And in Jerusalem we visited places where Jesus taught, prayed, worshipped, and wept.

Throughout the course of our trip our group took turns teaching, praying, worshipping, and weeping together. We followed in the steps of our Lord in the land of his home, which each of us came to see as our home as well.

Our guide for our trip was a fella named Mike. He quickly became one of my favorite people…mostly because within 10 minutes or so of knowing me he understood that Sarah is Hebrew for “trouble maker…”

I smiled. Mike smiled. The Bishop smiled. And our journey continued.

Towards the end of our journey across the Holy Land Mike posed this question and challenge to our group: What would it take, what would I need to consider, how would I need for God to transform me so that I could become home for someone else? To be a home for someone else means becoming a safe place, a place of support, a place of comfort, a place of care, a place of sanctuary. Serving as a home for someone does not mean that together we escape reality; rather, it is a means that where two or more are gathered Jesus is there with us, lightening our burdens, easing our hurts, providing for our needs, and walking with us as we commit to walking together whatever the path is before us.

In a sense Peter wanted to create homes for Jesus, Moses, and Elijah atop Mt. Tabor at the time of Jesus’ transfiguration. Peter’s intended to construct permanent residences that would take him, Jesus, and the other disciples with them away from the world. Why would Peter want to do this? Because days before Jesus foretold his coming passion. Luke 9:21-22 writes, “[Jesus] sternly ordered and commanded [the disciples] not to tell anyone, saying, ‘The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.” If Peter was successful in keeping Jesus on the mountain, then Peter could keep Jesus from this fate. Jesus could go on teaching and healing and bringing good news without enduring great suffering.

But Jesus was not seeking a savior or protector. Jesus was seeking – and seeks – partners, friends, and homes to serve others. Jesus sought in his disciples – and seeks in us – the commitment he introduces in his continued conversation with the disciples before his transfiguration, “Then [Jesus] said to them all, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it. What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves'” (Lk 9:23-25)?

The Good News of Jesus was and is that he became and becomes home for all. He put himself to suffering, bleeding, and dying so that we – his followers, his sisters and brothers – would know that while on life’s paths we do not walk alone. Not even death could separate us from Jesus for in three days time he was raised in glory.

So if nothing can separate us from Jesus – our eternal Savior and home – then why would we who are faithful separate ourselves from opportunities to be like Jesus and continue his ministry by becoming home for others? We can only be these homes if we open ourselves to be used by Jesus in this way and if we draw near to the portions of Christ’s Body that are in pain. Being a home cannot be accomplished at a distance. Jesus did not complete his servant ministry from on high; he was so close to humanity he could literally and did literally rub his nose in all of our hurt. And he redeemed it.

We can enjoy our times on the mountains, those high points in life. My trip to Israel is certainly one of them! And equally I believe Jesus wants us to enjoy our times in the valleys because that is where he served and calls us to serve by becoming home for others – for all.

Prayer: “You satisfy the hungry heart, with gift of finest wheat. Come, give to us, O saving Lord, the bread of life to eat. As when the shepherd calls his sheep, they know and heed his voice, so when you call your family, Lord, we follow and rejoice. You give yourself to us, O Lord; then selfless let us be, to serve each other in your name in truth and charity. You satisfy the hungry heart, with gift of finest wheat. Come, give to us, O saving Lord, the bread of life to eat.”* Amen.

*”You Satisfy the Hungry Heart,” The United Methodist Hymnal 629.