Thy Kingdom Come

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Mark 16:1-8.

My home church’s sanctuary has a balcony, and in the lower right corner of the balcony sits a small antiphonal organ. This organ offers a quieter, more reflective tone. When the organ plays it sounds as if the music crosses a great distance in order to enter the ear.

When I was very young the choir director’s wife always sang during the Good Friday service. She sang the same piece every year. She sang The Lord’s Prayer.

She stood in the corner of the balcony nearest that antiphonal organ and sang the prayer that Jesus taught us to pray. Those are words that I know well; they are words that my mother taught me in my earliest years. And yet hearing them sung from her lips and cascade from on high made the prayer’s words take on a haunting quality. I listened to those words as I viewed artwork depicting Jesus’ passion. As I looked on depictions of his suffering and his mortality, I considered my sin, my loss. On Good Friday it seemed as if the entire world was coming apart … and yet … that coming apart was and is a part of God’s kingdom coming.

Good Friday, by no means, is a warm or particularly joyful holy day celebration in the Christian year. Yet Good Friday, like Ash Wednesday, is needful. It provides space for us to reflect. It provides space for us to draw so near to God‘s incredible grace and repent of our sin. It provides space for us to look death in the face and know – and proclaim – that Sunday is coming.

In his book Falling Upward Fr. Richard Rohr writes, “God adjusts to the vagaries and failures of the moment. This ability to adjust to human disorder and failure is named God’s providence or compassion” (56). God adjusts – not meaning that God bends to accept our bent to sinning – but meaning that God bends low to help us stand.

God meets us where we are – at the foot of the cross and high upon it. God meets us where we are, and through grace, draws us where God wants us to be.

Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Prayer: “Lo, the Good Shepherd for the sheep is offered; the slave hath sinned, and the Son hath suffered. For our atonement, while we nothing heeded, God interceded.”* Amen.

*”Ah, Holy Jesus,” The United Methodist Hymnal 289.