Stewardship Is More Than Money

Sunday’s Scripture ~ II Corinthians 9:6-15

This Sunday the Tuskawilla community begins our Stewardship series in preparation for and anticipation of the 2015 ministry year. It will be a partnered series including (1) a collection of sermons on “Stewardship Is” that will explore the many facets of stewardship and (2) a collection of letters entitled “Known” that will connect what we know of our personal experiences with growing understandings and experiences of stewardship. I am very excited to begin this series because stewardship is so incredibly vital to our participation in the Body of Christ and helping build God’s kingdom on earth.

“God loves a cheerful giver” our Scripture text says this week. A person who gives is a person who has received.  I have vivid memories as a child and youth of my father saying, “You take care of what belongs (is given) to you more than what belongs to someone else.” I am sure this statement was made in reference to me tearing something up that was not mine. Regardless of the context, there is great truth in these words – I take care of what belongs to me because it is mine.

As I have engaged in this practice of care a greater truth has been revealed.  I take care of what belongs to me.  And now that degree of care influences the care I give to what has been entrusted to me for a season and influences the care I give in giving to others.

As a pastor I am entrusted with the spiritual nurturing and challenging of Christ’s body in a specific context. I am entrusted to care for a home in which the church invites my family to live. I am entrusted with the call to live faithfully and lead ethically.  All of this is for a season as I am in an itinerant appointive clergy system and my dedication of care will continue throughout all the years of my vocation. I believe that I have to lead by example. I cannot speak with integrity about others ascribing to this level and sensitivity of care if I do not live it in my own life.

As I live it in my own life I experience great joy. Yes, I am joyful every week when I clean my parsonage because it is a gift from the congregation to me. Yes, I am joyful to steward the church I serve – from baptizing babies to plunging toilets. Both involve water in different ways and both are important in their own ways!  Yes, I am joyful to be held accountable to how I lead and how I learn. And yes, I am joyful – and so incredibly thankful – how the lesson from my father continues to teach me and influence my care for entities that belong to others and my care for others.

“God loves a cheerful giver.”  I have cheerfully received – from God, from others, from God through others.  It is my pleasure to give and care in response and extension of how I have cared for what I have received. In giving as I have received I believe I incarnate the obedience our God desires to see. I do not always succeed in this obedience, which serves as another opportunity for growth in spiritual maturity in my relationship with God and greater accountability with my peers as we walk the journey of faith together.

That we travel together – that is one of the greatest gifts God has given and continues to give.

How do you care for what you have received?  What connection exists between how you care for your belongings and how you care for others?  If there is not a connection, how could you begin establishing a connection?

I invite you to prayerfully consider these questions and, as God leads you, live out your response.

Prayer: “But we never can prove the delights of his love until all on the altar we lay; for the favor he shows, for the joy he bestows, are for them who will trust and obey. Then in fellowship sweet we will sit at his feet or we’ll walk by his side in the way; what he says we will do, where he sends we will go; never fear, only trust and obey. Trust and obey, for there’s no other way to be happy in Jesus, but to trust and obey.”* Amen.

*”Trust and Obey,” The United Methodist Hymnal, 467.

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Atonement: Family Transaction

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Genesis 22:1-19

This Sunday is the first Sunday of Lent!  We also “spring ahead” at 2am on Sunday morning.  Three cheers for more sunlight…and being to worship on time!  Woot-Woot-Woohoo!

This week I find it rather fitting to study the almost child sacrifice of Isaac alongside the beginning of Lent, which is a season of sacrifice.  Both occasions – the pericope from Genesis and the liturgical season – are opportunities for obedience.

God gave Abraham instructions and he obeyed.  He started and – at the right time – God stopped him!  God provided another sacrifice – a gift of a ram so that Abraham could retain his greatest gift, his son.

The season of Lent presents us with an invitation to reflect and fast – reflect – on who we are and what we do; fast – that who we are and what we do make us more into who God desires.  We are not called to mandatory obedience in this reflecting and fasting…but I have to question why we would shy away from it?  Is it because we are too proud?  Is it because we are scared of what might be revealed?  Or is it because we are resigned in thinking that no change can come our way?

This past weekend I had the opportunity to lead enrichment sessions at a conference women’s retreat.  My session, Letters of Treasure, was a time for retreat participants to write letters to women currently incarcerated in our local area.  Our mission was to remind these ladies that they are women of worth; that they are treasured, beloved, and special; that they belong to God.  We wanted to affirm in these ladies that change is possible, that God is already at work in their lives, and that God is inviting their participation to continue their change to lead more healthy and whole lives.

In the letters we asked the ladies to consider who they were, who they are now, and who they wanted to be.  We encouraged the ladies to (1) identify their healthy behaviors and then (2) either transform unhealthy behaviors or leave them aside completely.  We invited them to reflect and and fast.  Why?  Because we believe change is possible.  Because we are affirmed that we bear the change of Christ in our bodies.  Because we believe reflecting and fasting are signs of our obedient faith.

It’s not about who these ladies have been or what they have done.  It’s about who God will lead them to be and what God will lead them to do.

The same is true for each one of us.

During this Lent I will take pause to reflect upon who I have been and ask God to lead me, break me, craft me into who God wants me to be.  Tonight I will starkly remember that all that I have is because of all that God has given and continues to give with the sign of the cross upon my brow.

Ashes to ashes.  Dust to dust.

During this Lent I will fast from all bread related products as a way of standing in solidarity with my neighbors worldwide who hunger and ache for daily bread.  My prayer is that in these 40 days God will lead my heart and my body to God’s true and everlasting nourishment that as God’s vessel I will be able to nourish others.

What will be your reflection this Lent?  Where will God lead you to fast?  How will God encourage, challenge, and increase your obedience?

Believe in change.  Be prepared for change.

Obey and change.

Prayer: “O God, maker of every thing and judge of all that you have made, from the dust of the earth you have formed us and from the dust of the earth you would raise us up.  By the redemptive power of the cross, create in us clean hearts and put within us a new spirit, that we may repent of our sins and lead lives worthy of your calling; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.”*

*”Ash Wednesday,” The United Methodist Hymnal, 353.