Parable of the Dragnet

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Matthew 13:47-51.

The summer of 2004 Andrew served as a lake interpreter at a Boy Scout camp in the Boundary Waters area of Northern Minnesota. He spent the summer taking different scout troops on 10 to 14 day paddle trips…and loved every minute of it.

I also think he wanted to have a summer where he did not have shower the.entire.summer.

And he did not…for 81 days…

He knew to shower before he boarded the flight home to see me.

Smart guy.

In regaling me with stories about his summer on the water, he would laugh the heartiest about the groups that showed up to the base with food to take with them on the water – canned food, snacks, MREs and more! And Andrew…being the stingy interpreter he was…would not let them take any food! None of it!

Why? Because if the boys were not paddling canoes, they were carrying canoes along with everything else they needed for their daily use and campsites. Andrew learned after his first trip that summer that if the scouts could not (literally) carry the weight brought with them, then he would have to carry it…and he did not sign up for that. So while inspecting the scout packs before departure, Andrew would make them pile up all their food to be left behind. They would spend the next 10 to 14 days on the water…and they would fish!

Some boys were fishing experts while others had a steep learning curve. They fished with rods and cast nets. Sometimes they caught fish…other times they caught whatever was in the lake that day…a coffee carafe was the most interesting item!

What I found most encouraging – after I recovered from the thought of Andrew denying the boys access to all the food they brought with them! – was how the boys applied themselves to the work and task of fishing. Fishing was essential for survival on their trip. If one scout had a hot line in the water and another scout was struggling, they took care of one another. Everyone ate. Everyone enjoyed his experience. They learned the value of teamwork, hard work, and being their brothers’ keeper.

The Kingdom of God is like…

This week we celebrate Pentecost – the birth of the Church – in the Christian year. On the day of Pentecost a great gathering of God’s people were gathered together in one place. The Holy Spirit descended and together God’s people worshipped. And from their worship many were convicted to repent and be baptized. And in response – in ownership – of their baptism they served together, ate together, affirmed their commitment to God by caring for and keeping their sisters and brothers together.

Together.

I truly believe that God intends us all to be together. And that when we are all together as the Church – worshipping, serving, sharing, affirming – we not only have enough; we have and are more than enough. To be the Church is hard work. From time to time we may have to leave things behind that we desperately want to bring forward with us so that we can make room to learn new skills, be adventurous in new areas, and blossom further into the people that God desires us to be.

I hope such great hope for the Church, for The United Methodist Church, and for Tuskawilla. God is bigger than all our challenges and God is so so faithful. God asks for our faithfulness. God asks for us to fish even when we are scared…even when we do not know how…even when we think we know a better way. God will and is taking care of us. We are the Church. We are God’s Church. And God is leading us into God’s preferred future.

Please plan to join us for a Congregational Meeting following our 11am Worship Service this Sunday, June 4 to receive an update about the work and continued work of your Tuskawilla UMC Leadership Team. We will meet in the Sanctuary immediately following the Benediction.

Prayer: “Wind who makes all winds that blow, gusts that bend the sapling low, gales that heave the sea in waves, stirrings in the mind’s deep caves: Aim your breath with steady power on your church, this day, this hour. Raise, renew the life we’ve lost, Spirit God of Pentecost.” Amen.*

*“Wind Who Makes All Winds That Blow,” The United Methodist Hymnal 538.

FAMILY ~ Intergenerational Culture

Sunday’s Scripture ~ Deuteronomy 6:4-9.

This Sunday the Tuskawilla UMC Family is joined in worship leadership by Rev. Melissa Cooper, program coordinator for the Life Enrichment Center and director of LECFamily. She will share with us a message that explores the basic understanding and benefit of creating, establishing, and growing an intergenerational culture in the church.

I am also a great big fan of Melissa…and this is the first time we will both be at Tuskawilla together. Be prepared for learning and merriment!

Today – April 25 – is the one year anniversary of the devastating earthquakes that ravaged Nepal. As I reflect once again on our trip, my memories return to the beautiful people of the country – their generosity, their hospitality, and their inclusivity. I was welcome. I was family. And from that experience, I continue to feel like family with the Nepali people.

Halfway through our trip Andrew and I travelled to Pohkara, which is in Western Central Nepal. It is home to the Annapurna Range of the Himalayan Mountains. On one of our days in Pohkara we visited an aboveground to underground waterfall that is fed by melting Himalayan snow.

Pohkara 2

Standing above the fall.

Pohkara 1

In the cave underground, a half mile from the aboveground site.

We were able to visit the underground cave because it was not yet monsoon season; during monsoon this cave is completely flooded.

To see base of the waterfall meant walking down ten flights of stairs; we were the equivalent of ten stories beneath the earth. The steps were old and rusted from years of being submerged in water for up to eight months at a time. The steps were not well lit and they were very steep.

Andrew and I started our journey down the steps and I was caught by the noise of laughter. I turned thinking I would see a group of children and what I saw was a group of Nepali grandmothers, in full length saris, standing at the top of the stairs watching one of their group begin to make her way down the stairs. Her friends’ laughter was not mocking or mean-spirited; they laughed out of astonishment and in the spirit of “tell me how it was when you get back up here!”

As long as she was in the faint light of the surface she kept walking down the steps, but as soon as the last vestiges of light disappeared in darkness, she stopped. I could see on her face the dilemma; she wanted to continue her descent, but she needed help.

Andrew and I looked at one another and silently decided what we would do. In many cultures it is not appropriate for a man to touch a woman that is not a member of his family; so, Andrew positioned himself in front of us in case we were to slip, he would catch us from slipping too far. I climbed back up the stairs, and without words, offered my arm and open hand to this grandmother. Separated by spoken language, but not the language of the heart, she took my hand and I braced her arm, and we continued our journey down the stairs.

When we reached the bottom, she began to laugh again, this time at the look of astonishment on her husband’s face! She had been the only wife to make the journey. She was so proud of herself; she shook with joy. Our eyes met one final time before I set off with Andrew to explore the cave. She was grateful. I was grateful. In that moment I walked with her as I have with my own grandmothers, in my family and in my congregations. Into darkness. Towards our goal. Sharing a beautiful, common, and shining light between us.

From a very young age I was taught to love God and to love others. I was taught to have my eyes open and ears attuned to opportunities where I could be a helper and a friend. These are lessons that were revisited for me throughout my childhood and adolescence; they are lessons that I take great joy in visiting with others. These are lessons that I teach with my words as well as my actions, and I am so grateful for the moments, like this time in Nepal, when my actions speak louder and longer than words.

God instructs us to teach the commandment to love God with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength to our family for generations. We are to revisit this lesson. Through active presence we are to have our eyes open and ears attuned to where we see this lesson incarnated and where we see this lesson needs incarnating.

Today I pray for the people of Nepal. I give thanks for all those that are incarnating our command to love God with all that they are – that we are – as this beautiful country and beautiful people continue rebuilding. I am grateful for the extended hands and outstretched arms. I am grateful for the people who walk alongside, especially if it is into darkness as the first of many steps, in reaching the Nepalis’ goal of rebuilding a people and a heritage. I am grateful for the sharing of the beautiful, common, and shining light between them.

Prayer: “O God, you divided the waters of chaos at creation. In Christ you stilled storms, raised the dead, and vanquished demonic powers. Tame the earthquake, wind, and fire, and all the forces that defy control or shock us by their fury. Keep us from calling disaster your justice. Help us, in good times and in distress, to trust your mercy and yield to your power, this day and for ever. Amen.

*”In Time of Natural Disaster,” The United Methodist Book of Worship 509.